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National Measurement Institute
      

Trade Measurement Compliance in 2016-17

Summary of 2016–17 compliance activity and outcomes

How can Australian consumers be sure what they pay for is what they get? Correct measurement is the answer - and the National Measurement Institute (NMI) ensures accuracy and fairness through extensive compliance work with businesses.

Consumers purchase millions of goods every day expecting that they will receive the correct measure (e.g. weight, volume, area, length or count) of the goods they’ve paid for.

NMI has 75 trade measurement staff based in 22 locations across Australia supporting the essential regulation of measurement transactions.

To help businesses comply with their legal obligations, NMI’s trade measurement inspectors:

  • test measuring instruments, inspect packaged goods and review business practices, including following up on complaints about potential breaches
  • provide advice on meeting compliance obligations
  • take enforcement action when necessary.

Through these activities, NMI aims to enhance the efficient operation of the market. NMI’s regulatory activities enable business and consumers to be confident that trade measurements are accurate, and provide value for all Australians by reducing transaction costs across the economy.

In 2016–17, NMI’s trade measurement inspectors:

  • audited just over 10,000 business premises, up 1 per cent from 2015–16
  • tested over 17,000 measuring instruments, up 12 per cent from 2015–16
  • inspected over 1000 weighbridges, up 14 per cent from 2015-16
  • inspected nearly 88,000 lines of packaged goods (over 355,000 individual packages) for correct measure and measurement labelling, up 10 per cent from 2015-16.

66 per cent of businesses were found to be compliant in an initial audit in 2016–17, the same proportion as in 2015-16. Most cases of non-compliance do not affect the integrity of measurement-based transactions, and most businesses promptly rectify trade measurement infringements once they are made aware of them.

In planning those audits in 2016-17, NMI was able to better focus compliance activities through enhanced data collection and analysis. This enabled NMI to match previous trade measurement compliance information with statistics on business distribution by industry type.

Also in 2016-17, NMI began collecting data to estimate the potential losses for customers from non-compliance detected in a sample of business audits.

Good news

Overall, there’s satisfactory business compliance with trade measurement law in Australia. While 34% of businesses were found non-compliant in an initial audit, after 2284 follow-up audits only 372 (16 per cent) businesses were still breaching the law.

Accuracy in petrol and diesel dispensers is a consistent consumer concern. In 2016–17 NMI inspectors tested 1779 bowsers and found 105 (6 per cent) were measuring inaccurately. Inaccuracy was split between 51 (2.9 per cent) that dispensed extra fuel and 54 (3.0 per cent) that did not dispense enough.
Non-compliant business types identified in initial audits in 2016-17 included:

  • fruit and vegetable retail — 53 per cent
  • bakery retail – 45 per cent
  • importer – 44 per cent.

Only 309 (1.8 per cent) of 17,093 measuring instruments inspected in 2016-17 were inaccurate to the consumer’s detriment, while 571 (3.3 per cent) were inaccurate to the consumer’s advantage.
Instrument categories found to be inaccurate to the consumer’s detriment in 2016-17 included:

  • weighbridges – 8 per cent
  • beverage dispensers – 7 per cent.

Of the 87,964 lines of prepacked goods (355,438 individual packages) examined by trade measurement inspectors in 2016–17, a healthy 84,445 (96 per cent) were correct measure.
Product categories with the highest percentages of incorrect measure detected in 2016–17 included:

  • seafood (fresh) —7 per cent
  • meat (fresh) —7 per cent
  • ready to eat/cook meals — 9 per cent
  • meat (processed) —  9 per cent.

Notices, warnings and fines issued in 2016–17

As a result of non-compliance identified during trade measurement inspections in 2016–17, NMI:

  • issued 3708 non-compliance notices, up 26 per cent from 2015–16
  • sent 306 warning letters, up 65 per cent from 2015–16
  • issued 75 infringement notices with fines totalling $70,200, down 18 per cent from the 87 fines totalling $85,100 in 2015–16.

In 2016–17 three convictions were recorded for offences under the National Measurement Act 1960. NMI also referred a further three matters for consideration by the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

Business audits 2016-17

In 2016-17, NMI’s trade measurement inspectors conducted audits at 10,239 business premises across Australia to check compliance with trade measurement law, compared with 10,123 audits in 2015-16.
As part of a business audit, NMI inspectors will test measuring instruments, inspect packaged goods and review business practices, including following up on complaints about potential breaches.

Inspectors usually wear branded clothing and show an ID card to the business owner/operator at the commencement of an audit. However, inspectors can also make incognito ‘trial purchases’ to assess whether businesses are, for example, correctly operating scales and allowing for the weight of packaging during over-the-counter transactions.

Of the 7955 business premises visited for an initial audit in 2016–17, NMI inspectors found that 5215 (66 per cent) were compliant with their obligations under trade measurement law, the same as in 2015–16. In 2014–15, 60 per cent of business premises were found to be compliant as a result of an initial audit.

NMI inspectors found 2740 (34 per cent) premises in 2016-17 where at least one example of non-compliance was detected in an initial audit. For the most part, however, the breaches detected were relatively minor and, following the issue of a non-compliance notice and advice from the inspector, were corrected by the business.
Business types with a relatively large percentage of non-compliant businesses in 2016-17 included:

  • fruit and vegetable retail —non-compliance found at 346 (53 per cent) of 651 initial audits, compared with 171 (50 per cent) of 344 initial audits in 2015-16
  • bakery retail –non-compliance found at 66 (45 per cent) of 148 initial audits, compared with 51 (45 per cent) of 113 initial audits in 2015-16
  • importer –non-compliance found at 23 (44 per cent) of 52 initial audits, compared with 45 (31 per cent) of 144 initial audits in 2015-16
  • market trader & itinerant vendor –non-compliance found at 108 (44 per cent) of 248 initial audits, compared with 84 (39 per cent) of 214 initial audits in 2015-16
  • freight –non-compliance found at 21 (43 per cent) 49 initial audits, compared with 10 (26 per cent) of 38 initial audits in 2015-16
  • meat retail –non-compliance found at 350 (42 per cent) of 833 initial audits, compared with 276 (40 per cent) of 697 initial audits in 2015-16
  • confectionery wholesaler/retailer –non-compliance found at 130 (41 per cent) of 321 initial audits, compared with 32 (40 per cent) of 80 initial audits in 2015-16
  • seafood retail –non-compliance found at 71 (39 per cent) of184 initial audits, compared with 54 (36 per cent) of 150 initial audits in 2015-16.

Of the 2284 business premises visited for a follow-up audit in 2016-17, only 372 (16 per cent) were found to still be breaching the law, a similar proportion to 2015-16. As noted below, businesses that failed a follow-up audit accounted for 73 per cent of fines issued in 2016-17.


Figure 1: 10,239 Business Audits in 2016-17

Collapsed - Table 1: Tabular Data for Figure 1

Category

Number

Initial Audits (Compliant)

5,215

Initial Audits (Non-Compliant)

2,740

Follow-Up Audits (Compliant)

1,912

Follow-Up Audits (Non-Compliant)

372

Targeted compliance activity 2016–17

NMI combines market intelligence, consumer complaints and stakeholder feedback with compliance history to plan and implement national targeted inspection programs for industry sectors that have a higher risk of non-compliance with the requirements of trade measurement law.

NMI undertakes pilot programs to assess the level of risk associated with non-compliance in particular or emerging industry sectors. These pilot programs are used to determine whether a national targeted program needs to be introduced.

The results from national targeted and pilot programs in 2016–17 are outlined below.

National targeted programs

Community Savings

The Community Savings Program has been implemented to capture data on likely financial loss suffered by customers in a sample of trade measurement transactions across a broad range of industry types.
3807 business audits were conducted under this program in 2016-17, including 3068 initial audits and 739 follow-up audits. Non-compliance was identified at 1020 (33 per cent) of the 3068 initial visits. Non-compliance identified though the program included:

  • 891 (13 per cent) of 7043 instruments inspected
  • 2,683 (8 per cent) of 35,006 packaging lines inspected
  • 142 (21 per cent) of 694 trial purchases conducted.

When potential financial detriment through non-compliant instruments, packages or trading practices was identified, the inspector sought further information from the business on the total value of related transactions in order to estimate the level of detriment over a year. Where this information was provided, the total annual financial detriment for the non-compliance identified through the program was estimated at $1,007,150.
Five business types accounted for 80 per cent of the estimated financial detriment:

  • Fruit & Vegetable Retail (20 per cent)
  • Licenced Premises (18 per cent)
  • Meat Retail (17 per cent)
  • Importer (13 per cent)
  • Meat Wholesale (12 per cent).

Enforcement action undertaken as a result of audits included:

  • 18 infringement notices totalling $16,200 for shortfall in packaged goods
  • 3 infringement notices totalling $2700 for non-compliant measuring instruments
  • 2 infringement notices totalling $1800 for breaches of trading practices.

Confectionery

627 business audits were conducted under NMI’s Confectionery Program between 1 July 2016 and 31 December 2016, including 512 initial audits and 115 follow-up audits. Of the 512 initial visits, non-compliance was identified at 183 premises (36 per cent).

Non-compliance identified though the program included:

  • 73 (18 per cent) of 402 instruments inspected
  • 949 (6 per cent) of 16,341 packaging lines inspected
  • 17 (22 per cent) of 77 trial purchases conducted.

Enforcement actions undertaken as a result of audits included 7 infringement notices totalling $6300, all for shortfall in packaged goods.

Harvest to Home

1571 business audits were conducted under NMI’s Harvest to Home Program between 1 February and 30 June 2017, including 1265 initial audits and 306 follow-up audits. Of the 1265 initial audits, non-compliance was identified at 515 premises (41 per cent).

Non-compliance identified though the program included:

  • 386 (16 per cent) of 2397 instruments inspected
  • 1754 (12 per cent) of 15,034 packaging lines inspected
  • 125 (45 per cent) of 294 trial purchases conducted.

Enforcement actions undertaken as a result of audits included 12 infringement notices totalling $10,800 covering 8 breaches for shortfall in packaged goods, 2 breaches for non-compliant measuring instruments and 2 breaches of trading practices.

Pilot programs

Macadamia Nut Industry

Twenty business across northern NSW and SE Queensland involved in receiving, processing, or packing of macadamia nuts were visited by NMI inspectors in late 2016 and early 2017 to assess the industry’s compliance with trade measurement laws.

All packages checked were labelled in accordance with the regulations and contained correct weight.
Only one business was issued a non-compliance notice for using unapproved and unverified bulk weighing instruments (eg: hoppers and platform scales).

Overall the macadamia nut industry demonstrated it had robust quality systems in place to ensure that measurements are accurate, including regular testing of measuring instruments. The industry appears to be very consistent in the application of procedures that affect payment to the seller or grower of macadamia nut.

There also appears to be a culture of continuous improvement in the industry, which can only benefit all parties involved.

Compliance of measuring instruments 2016–17

In 2016–17 trade measurement inspectors checked 17,093 measuring instruments used for trade and found that 14,664 (86 per cent) were compliant with legislative requirements (see Figure 2). This was an improvement on the 83 per cent of instruments found to be compliant in 2015–16 and 84 per cent in 2014–15.

An instrument was deemed non-compliant if one or more of the following was found:

  • not verified by an authorised servicing licensee
  • failed to measure accurately, or
  • did not meet other standards necessary to comply with legislation.

The 829 instruments (4.8 per cent) identified as not verified were not tested for accuracy but referred to an authorised servicing licensee for verification. This was equivalent to the four per cent of instruments inspected which were found to be not verified in 2015-16 and 2014–15.

880 of the instruments inspected (5.1 per cent) failed to measure accurately but were more likely to be over measuring rather than under measuring. 571 instruments (3.3 per cent) were inaccurate to the consumer’s advantage and 309 (1.8 per cent) were inaccurate to the consumer’s detriment.

The remaining 646 instruments (3.9 per cent) inspected and found to be non-compliant, tested as accurate but did not meet other legislative requirements, such as display issues; eccentricity; inadequate sealing; and data plate irregularities.

Of the 309 measuring instruments found to be inaccurate to consumer disadvantage, the instrument categories with the greatest percentage of inaccurate instruments in 2016-17 included:

  • weighbridges – 94 (8 per cent) of the 1147 instruments tested, an increase on the 52 (five per cent) of 960 instruments tested in 2015-16
  • beverage dispensers – 62 (7 per cent) of the 945 instruments tested, an increase on the 35 (four per cent) of 865 instruments tested in 2015-16
  • weighing instruments (30 kilograms to 3 tonnes) – 23 (5 per cent) of the 475 instruments tested, an increase on the 16 (four per cent) of 364 instruments tested in 2015-16
  • fuel dispensers – 54 (3 per cent) of the 1779 instruments tested, an increase on the 70 (2 per cent) of 2925 instruments tested in 2015-16.

Potential inaccuracy of retail liquid fuel (petrol and diesel) dispensers often attracts significant consumer concern. In 2016–17 trade measurement inspectors tested 1779 of this instrument type and found 229 (13 per cent) to be non-compliant, including 105 (6 per cent) that were measuring inaccurately. Inaccurate instruments were, however, essentially evenly split between 51 (2.9 per cent) that were dispensing extra fuel and 54 (3.0 per cent) that were inaccurate to consumer disadvantage.


Figure 2: Measuring Instrument Inspection Results 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 2: Tabular Data for Figure 2

Category

Percentage (%)

Compliant

86.2%

Incorrect (Consumer Advantage)

3.3%

Incorrect (Consumer Disadvantage)

1.8%

Other Issue

3.9%

Not Verified

4.8%

Compliance of prepacked articles 2016–17

Trade measurement inspectors examined 87,964 lines of prepacked goods (355,438 individual packages) in 2016–17 to check whether they:

  • contained the correct amount (weight, volume or units) as displayed on the label
  • displayed sufficient measurement marking (e.g. weight, price per kilogram and total price for the article) in the correct format and position
  • included correct packer identification (name and street address of packer if packed within Australia or name and address of importer or seller).

Measurement labelling of prepacked articles

Six per cent of all prepacked lines inspected had non-compliant measurement labelling 2016-17. This was higher than the two per cent recorded in 2015-16 but lower than the seven per cent recorded in 2014-15 and 14 per cent in 2013-14. As shown in Figure 3, the product categories with the highest percentages of incorrect measurement labelling detected in 2016–17 were:

  • fruit & vegetables (fresh) — 1712 (9 per cent) of 19,730 lines (76,743 packages) inspected
  • bakery — 423 (10 per cent) of 4343 lines (17,354 packages) inspected
  • seafood (fresh) — 61 (10 per cent) of 609 lines (2083 packages) inspected
  • ready to eat/cook meals — 68 (11 per cent) of 611 lines (2356 packages) inspected
  • beverages (including alcohol) — 35 (24 per cent) of 146 lines (656 packages) inspected
  • oil (edible) — 7 (29 per cent) of 24 lines (110 packages) inspected
  • sauce —  62 (31 per cent) of 199 lines (514 packages) inspected.


Figure 3: Labelling of Prepacked Articles 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 3: Tabular Data for Figure 3

Category

% Correct

% Incorrect

AVERAGE [87964]

94%

6%

Sauce [199]

69%

31%

Oil (Edible) [24]

71%

29%

Beverages (incl Alcohol) [146]

76%

24%

Ready to Eat/Cook Meals [611]

89%

11%

Seafood (Fresh) [609]

90%

10%

Bakery [4343]

90%

10%

Fruit & Vegetables (Fresh) [19730]

91%

9%

Seafood (Frozen) [813]

93%

7%

Fruit & Vegetables (Processed) [1293]

93%

7%

Confectionery/Snack Foods [22525]

95%

5%

Farm Supplies [164]

95%

5%

Personal Grooming/Hygiene [693]

95%

5%

Landscape Materials [125]

96%

4%

Meat (Processed) [2153]

97%

3%

Pet Supplies [1563]

97%

3%

Dairy (Other) [428]

97%

3%

Herbs/Spices/Seasoning [1918]

97%

3%

Meat (Fresh - excl Seafood) [13214]

97%

3%

Other (not able to categorise elsewhere) [5888]

97%

3%

Fuel (Solid) [39]

97%

3%

Health Foods [4228]

98%

2%

Breakfast Foods [375]

98%

2%

Cooking/Baking Ingredients [3012]

99%

1%

Dairy (Cheese) [3130]

100%

0%

Oil (Non Edible) [1]

100%

0%

Chemicals (Industrial) [39]

100%

0%

Dairy (Milk) [28]

100%

0%

Chemicals (Household) [218]

100%

0%

Hardware [443]

100%

0%

Fuel (Liquid) [12]

100%

0%

Measurement of prepacked articles

Trade measurement inspections have identified a significant improvement in the rate of prepacked goods tested containing correct measure (weight, volume or units) over recent years. In 2016-17, 96 per cent of prepacked lines examined contained the correct measure, down just 1 per cent from 97 per cent recorded in 2015-16 and up from 93 per cent recorded in 2014-15 and 89 per cent in 2013-14.

As shown in Figure 4, the product categories with the highest percentages of incorrect measure detected in 2016–17 were:

  • dairy (cheese) — 145 (5 per cent) of 3130 lines (11,409 packages) inspected
  • seafood (fresh) — 42 (7 per cent) of 609 lines (2083 packages) inspected
  • meat (fresh) — 919 (7 per cent) of 13,214 lines (46,236 packages) inspected
  • dairy (milk) — 2 (7 per cent) of 28 lines (119 packages) inspected
  • landscape materials — 9 (7 per cent) of 125 lines (599 packages) inspected
  • ready to eat/cook meals — 52 (9 per cent) of 611 lines (2356 packages) inspected
  • meat (processed) —  201 (9 per cent) of 2153 lines (8131 packages) inspected
  • fuel (liquid) —  2 (17 per cent) of 12 lines (53 packages) inspected.


Figure 4: Measurement of Prepacked Articles 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 4: Tabular Data for Figure 4

Category

% Correct

% Incorrect

AVERAGE [87964]

96%

4%

Fuel (Liquid) [12]

83%

17%

Meat (Processed) [2153]

91%

9%

Ready to Eat/Cook Meals [611]

91%

9%

Landscape Materials [125]

93%

7%

Dairy (Milk) [28]

93%

7%

Meat (Fresh - excl Seafood) [13214]

93%

7%

Seafood (Fresh) [609]

93%

7%

Dairy (Cheese) [3130]

95%

5%

Dairy (Other) [428]

96%

4%

Bakery [4343]

96%

4%

Chemicals (Household) [218]

96%

4%

Fruit & Vegetables (Fresh) [19730]

96%

4%

Seafood (Frozen) [813]

97%

3%

Pet Supplies [1563]

97%

3%

Farm Supplies [164]

97%

3%

Sauce [199]

97%

3%

Fuel (Solid) [39]

97%

3%

Chemicals (Industrial) [39]

97%

3%

Fruit & Vegetables (Processed) [1293]

98%

2%

Confectionery/Snack Foods [22525]

98%

2%

Health Foods [4228]

98%

2%

Cooking/Baking Ingredients [3012]

99%

1%

Other (not able to categorise elsewhere) [5888]

99%

1%

Herbs/Spices/Seasoning [1918]

99%

1%

Beverages (incl Alcohol) [146]

99%

1%

Breakfast Foods [375]

99%

1%

Hardware [443]

100%

0%

Personal Grooming/Hygiene [693]

100%

0%

Oil (Non Edible) [1]

100%

0%

Oil (Edible) [24]

100%

0%

Enforcement actions 2016–17

Enforcement action of a more serious nature is taken when:

  • continued non-compliance is detected after a notice has been previously issued
  • a breach detected in an initial audit is particularly severe, and/or
  • contraventions are of high public interest.

Potential enforcement actions include:

  • warning letters
  • infringement notices with associated fines
  • enforceable undertakings
  • referral to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions for injunction or prosecution.

The maximum penalty for a business breaching trade measurement law in 2016-17 was $180,000 per offence.

Infringement notices

Only serious or repeated breaches of trade measurement law attract an infringement notice or fine. A single infringement notice can reference multiple breaches of trade measurement law. 75 infringement notices were issued in 2016–17 with $70,200 in associated fines covering 80 breaches, including:

  • 67 (84 per cent) breaches for short measure in prepacked articles
  • 9 (11 per cent) breaches for non-compliant trading practices
  • 4 (5 per cent) breaches for incorrect measuring instruments

55 (73 per cent) of the 75 infringement notices were issued after continued non-compliance was identified in a follow-up audit.

The business categories with the highest number of infringement notices in 2016–17 were:

  • supermarkets — 24 fines totalling $24,300, up from 21 fines totalling $21,150 in 2015-16, covering:
    • 23 breaches for short measure
    • 4 breaches for non-compliant trading practices
    • 1 breach for using an inaccurate measuring instrument.
  • fruit & vegetables retail  — 9 fines totalling $8100, up from 8 fines totalling $7900 in 2015-16, covering:
    • 7 breaches for short measure
    • 1 breach for non-compliant trading practices
    • 1 breach for using an inaccurate measuring instrument.
  • small business (food) — 6 fines totalling $5400, a substantial decrease from 18 fines totalling $15,900 in 2015-16, covering:
    • 5 breaches for short measure
    • 1 breach for non-compliant for trading practices.
  • confectionery wholesaler/retailer — 6 fines totalling $5400, up from 3 fines totalling $2600 in 2015-16, all for short measure.
  • meat retail — 5 fines totalling $4500, up from 4 fines totalling $3500 in 2015-16, covering:
    • 3 breaches for short measure
    • 2 breaches for non-compliant trading practices.
  • importer — 5 fines totalling $4500, a slight decrease from 6 fines totalling $6100 in 2015-16, all for short measure.


Figure 5: Infringement Notice Categories 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 5: Tabular Data for Figure 5

Category

Number

Prepacked Articles (Short Measure)

67

Trading Practices

9

Measuring Instruments

4

Prosecutions

Where non-compliance and infringement notices have not proved successful in deterring businesses from breaching trade measurement law, or there is a significant public interest, NMI can refer matters to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions for consideration of injunction or prosecution.

In 2016–17 three convictions were recorded for offences under the National Measurement Act 1960:

  • Bon Fleur Australia Pty Ltd was convicted and fined $14,000 in Downing Centre Local Court (Sydney) on 6 December 2016 for three offences of packing short weight nougat products.
  • Coles Supermarkets Australia Pty Ltd pleaded guilty in Brisbane Magistrates Court on 7 October 2016 to three offences of packing short weight bread products. They were ordered to pay a $7500 fine plus court costs.
  • Tobias QLD Pty Ltd, trading as Noosa Chocolate Factory, pleaded guilty in Maroochydore Magistrates Court on 2 June 2017 to three offences of including weight of packaging when a product was weighed and priced for sale and one offence of not including a weight statement on a packaged product. They were ordered to pay a $12,400 fine plus court costs.

NMI also referred a further three matters for consideration by the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

Complaints and enquiries 2016–17

The national trade measurement hotline (tel: 1300 686 664) is one of the key contact points for consumers and businesses to find out about trade measurement law or to lodge a complaint about potential breaches.

Complaints received by category

In 2016–17, the NMI received 672 complaints, mainly from consumers about potential breaches of trade measurement law, of which 113 (17 per cent) were found to be justified when investigated.

As in previous years, the majority of complaints received related to petrol and other fuels (both liquid and gas), and these accounted for 411 (61 per cent) of 672 complaints in 2016–17. Also repeating the experience of previous years, when investigated the great majority of fuel related complaints turned out to be unjustified.

Only 18 (4 per cent) of the fuel related complaints were found to be justified because of a fuel dispenser being inaccurate to consumer disadvantage in 2016–17.

The other main areas for complaints in 2016–17 were also similar to 2015–16 and included:

  • prepacked articles and packaging — 69 complaints, 24 (35 per cent) justified
  • meat— 25 complaints, 9 (36 per cent) justified
  • fruit and vegetables — 18 complaints, 6 (33 per cent) justified
  • seafood— 8 complaints, 4 (50 per cent) justified
  • firewood — 13 complaints, 2 (15 per cent) justified.


Figure 6: Complaints Received by Category 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 6: Tabular Data for Figure 6

Category

Percentage (%)

Petrol and Liquid Fuels

52%

Prepacked Articles and Packaging

11%

LPG CNG and LNG Fuels

10%

Complaint

6%

Measurement Practice

5%

Meat (excluding Seafood)

4%

Other issue

3%

Fruit and Vegetables

3%

Landscape and Building Materials

2%

Firewood

2%

Seafood (excluding Meat)

1%

Alcohol and Glassware

1%

Enquiries received by category

We received 842 enquiries, mainly from businesses, seeking further information about the application of trade measurement law. A further 1076 enquiries were received from servicing licensees.

The main topics of business enquiries in 2016–17 were similar to 2015–16 and included:

  • prepacked articles and packaging (27 per cent)
  • measurement practice (13 per cent)
  • alcohol and glassware (5 per cent)
  • petrol and liquid fuels (4 per cent)
  • pattern approval (4 per cent)


Figure 7: Enquiries Received by Category 2016–17

Collapsed - Table 7: Tabular Data for Figure 7

Category

Percentage (%)

Prepacked Articles and Packaging

27%

Other issue

19%

Measurement Practice

13%

Enquiry

8%

Non Trade Measurement issue

5%

Alcohol & Glassware

5%

Petrol and Liquid Fuels

4%

Pattern Approval

4%

Licensing

3%

Meat (excluding Seafood)

2%

Laboratory

2%

Weighbridge Exemptions

2%

Firewood

2%

Fruit and Vegetables

1%

Landscape and Building Materials

1%

NMI Training

1%

Bakery Goods

1%

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